A Life For The Tsar

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According to one Russian commentator, A Life for the Tsar ‘marked the boundary between the past and the future of Russian music’. After its premiere in 1836 in St. Petersburg, the importance of Glinka’s ‘patriotic heroic-tragic opera’ was quickly recognised not only by the literary men such as Pushkin and Gogol but across the Russian. This became A Life for the Tsar and although much of the forms, especially when vocal set-pieces were involved, were borrowed from French and Italian opera, Glinka went far beyond his models in using novel musical means (including the pioneering use of leitmotifs) to bring a real musical and dramatic unity to the opera. It was premiered in the. A Life for the Tsar, as it is known in English, although its original name was Ivan Susanin is a 'patriotic-heroic tragic opera' in four acts with an epilogue by Mikhail Glinka. The original Russian libretto, based on historical events, was written by Nestor Kukolnik, Georgy Fyodorovich Rozen, Vladimir Sollogub and Vasily Zhukovsky.

Life

Recordings

  1. Directed by Derek Bailey. With Yevgeni Nesterenko, Maria Mescheryakova, Alexander Lomonosov, Elena Zaremba.
  2. A Life for the Tsar, as it is known in English, although its original name was Ivan Susanin is a 'patriotic-heroic tragic opera' in four acts with an epilogue by Mikhail Glinka. The original Russian libretto, based on historical events, was written by Nestor Kukolnik, Georgy Fyodorovich Rozen, Vladimir Sollogub and Vasily Zhukovsky.

Source: operadis-opera-discography.org.uk Photo age regression software free.

  • 1947, Aleksander Melik-Pasheyev (conductor), Bolshoy Theatre Orchestra and Chorus, Maksim Mikhaylov (Ivan Susanin), Nataliya Shpiller (Antonida), Georgiy Nelepp (Bogdan Sobinin), Yelizaveta Antonova (Vanya), Fyodor Svetlanov (Sigizmund King of Poland), Sergey Khosson (Russian soldier), Ivan Skobtsov (Polish messenger)
  • 1956, Oscar Danon (conductor), Chorus of the Yugoslav Army and Orchestra of the National Opera, Belgrade; Miro Changalovich (Susanin); Maria Glavachevich (Antonida); Militza Miladinovich (Vanya); Drago Startz (Sobinin). Decca LP set, no. LXT5173-6. There is no copyright date on the record labels, but the box states 'Printed in England, 56/4', hence a probable release date of 1956.
Libretto
  • 1957, Igor Markevitch (Conductor), Artistes et Choeurs de l'Opera de Belgrade (Chef des Choeurs: Oscar Danon); Orchestre de l'Association des Concerts Lamoureux; Boris Christoff, Bass:(Ivan Soussanine); Theresa Stich-Randall, soprano: (Antonida); Nicolai Gedda, tenor: (Bogdane Sobinine); Mela Bugarinovitch, contralto: (Vania). Recorded in Paris on 26 November through 18 December 1957. No other singer's names given.
  • 1986, Ivan Marinov (Conductor), Sofia National Opera Orchestra, Sofia National Opera Chorus; Nicola Ghiuselev (Ivan Susanin), Elena Stoyanova (Antonida), Cristina Angelakova (Vanya), Roumen Doikov (Sabinin), Dimiter Stanchev, Angel Petkov.
  • 1989, Emil Tchakarov (Conductor), Sofia National Opera Chorus (chorus masters: Lyubomir Karoleev and Hristo Kazandjiev); Sofia Festival Orchestra; Boris Martinovich (Ivan Susanin); Alexandrina Pendachanska (Antonida); Chris Merritt (Sobinin); Stefania Toczyska (Vanya); Stoil Georgiev (Commander of the Polish detachment); Mincho Popov (Polish messenger); Konstantin Videv (Commander of the Russian detachment). Recorded in Sofia (Hall 1, National Palace of Culture) on 9th-15th September 1989.

A Life For The Tsar Libretto

  • 1992, Alexander Lazarev (Conductor), Bolshoi Theatre Orchestra and Chorus, Evgeny Nesterenko (Ivan Susanin), Marina Mescheriakova (Antonida), Alexander Lomonosov (Bogdan Sobinin), Elena Zaremba (Vanya), Boris Bezhko (Sigizmund King of Poland). Kultur/NVC Arts DVD