Attila Opera

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Femme fatale
In the opera: Attila is smitten with Odabella, a captured warrior woman from the conquered city of Aquileia. He presents her with his sword and she appears to accept his offer of marriage. In Act Three, when he finds his wife-to-be with a Roman general who’s her real beloved, Attila realizes—too late—that he’s been betrayed.

In history: In 450 A.D., Attila received a plea for help from Princess Honoria, sister of the Western Roman Emperor Valentinian III. She was in an unhappy engagement and sent a messenger to the Hun with a promise of gold and a ring if he would intervene on her behalf. Attila wrongly interpreted this as a marriage proposal and accepted it, as well as half of the Western Empire as her dowry. Honoria did not want to marry Attila, and ultimately married her original beau. Attila responded to this rejection like any spurned lover would and marched on France. Goodbye 3 / 5.2 denial of service tool 2020.

Attila Opera Review

Attila Opera

There’s no place like Rome
In the opera: As prophecies tend to do in opera, this one came true. Attila is betrayed by his new lover as Roman troops march on the Hun army, thus ending the brutal rule of Attila the Hun.
In history: Legend has it that St. Peter and St. Paul themselves appeared to Attila and threatened him into settling a deal with Pope Leo I. In reality, a famine had just swept the peninsula and it likely would have been prohibitively expensive to continue the onslaught.

Attila responded to this rejection like any spurned lover would and marched on France. There’s no place like Rome In the opera: As prophecies tend to do in opera, this one came true. Attila is betrayed by his new lover as Roman troops march on the Hun army, thus ending the brutal rule of Attila the Hun. In this virtual concert, Music Director Designate Enrique Mazzola leads world-renowned principal artists Christian Van Horn, Bass-baritone (Attila), Tamara Wilson, Soprano (Odabella), Matthew Polenzani (Foresto), and Quinn Kelsey (Ezio) with members of the Lyric Opera Chorus in a series of excerpts from Verdi's ATTILA, accompanied by pianists William C. Billingham and Jerad Mosbey.

Attila Opera

Attila Opera House

Boris Christoff (Attila), Giangiacomo Guelfi (Ezio), Margherita Roberti (Odabella), Gastone Limarilli (Foresto), Franco Franchi (Uldino), Mario Frosini (Leone) Orchestra & Coro del Maggio Musicale Fiorentino, Orchestra del Teatro alla Scala di Milano, Bruno Bartoletti, Gabriele Santini. Giuseppe Verdi's 3 Act Opera, Attila, is based on the play Attila, King of the Huns by Friedrich Ludwig Zacharias Werner. Set in mid 5th century Rome, the opera premiered on March 17th, 1846 at the La Fenice Opera House in Venice Italy and tells the story of Attila the Hun and his downfall in Rome.