Github Markup Language

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Markup language. Quite the same Wikipedia. We show rendered markup in several places on GitHub, most notably including a project’s main README on the Repository page itself. Starting today, GitHub supports relative links in markup files.

The Pango Markup Language — a simple markup language for encoding attributes with text. The pango markup language is a very simple SGML-like language. HTML elements # T. The complete set of HTML elements is the set of elements described in the following sections. In addition to the HTML elements listed below, the math element from the MathML namespace and the svg element from the SVG namespace are allowed in documents wherever phrasing content is allowed.

Markdown is a lightweight and easy-to-use syntax for styling all forms of writing on the GitHub platform.

What you will learn:

  • How the Markdown format makes styled collaborative editing easy
  • How Markdown differs from traditional formatting approaches
  • How to use Markdown to format text
  • How to leverage GitHub’s automatic Markdown rendering
  • How to apply GitHub’s unique Markdown extensions

What is Markdown?

Markdown is a way to style text on the web. You control the display of the document; formatting words as bold or italic, adding images, and creating lists are just a few of the things we can do with Markdown. Mostly, Markdown is just regular text with a few non-alphabetic characters thrown in, like # or *.

You can use Markdown most places around GitHub:

  • Comments in Issues and Pull Requests
  • Files with the .md or .markdown extension

For more information, see “Writing on GitHub” in the GitHub Help.

Examples

It's very easy to make some words bold and other words italic with Markdown. You can even link to Google!

Syntax guide

Here’s an overview of Markdown syntax that you can use anywhere on GitHub.com or in your own text files.

Headers

Emphasis

Lists

Unordered

Ordered

Images

Links

Blockquotes

Inline code

GitHub Flavored Markdown

GitHub.com uses its own version of the Markdown syntax that provides an additional set of useful features, many of which make it easier to work with content on GitHub.com.

Note that some features of GitHub Flavored Markdown are only available in the descriptions and comments of Issues and Pull Requests. These include @mentions as well as references to SHA-1 hashes, Issues, and Pull Requests. Task Lists are also available in Gist comments and in Gist Markdown files.

Syntax highlighting

Here’s an example of how you can use syntax highlighting with GitHub Flavored Markdown:

You can also simply indent your code by four spaces:

Here’s an example of Python code without syntax highlighting:

Task Lists

If you include a task list in the first comment of an Issue, you will get a handy progress indicator in your issue list. It also works in Pull Requests!

Tables

You can create tables by assembling a list of words and dividing them with hyphens - (for the first row), and then separating each column with a pipe :

Would become:

First HeaderSecond Header
Content from cell 1Content from cell 2
Content in the first columnContent in the second column

Github Markdown Syntax

Toc

SHA references

Any reference to a commit’s SHA-1 hash will be automatically converted into a link to that commit on GitHub.

Issue references within a repository

Any number that refers to an Issue or Pull Request will be automatically converted into a link.

Username @mentions

Typing an @ symbol, followed by a username, will notify that person to come and view the comment. This is called an “@mention”, because you’re mentioning the individual. You can also @mention teams within an organization.

Github Markup Language

Automatic linking for URLs

Any URL (like http://www.github.com/Docker container install vim. ) will be automatically converted into a clickable link.

Strikethrough

Any word wrapped with two tildes (like ~~this~~) will appear crossed out.

Emoji

GitHub supports emoji!

To see a list of every image we support, check out the Emoji Cheat Sheet.

Last updated Jan 15, 2014


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general

history:HTML (HyperText Markup Language) was developed in 1989.

“HTML stands for HyperText Machine (or Markup) Language. HTML is a subset of SGML. It is a computer language used to create webpages. A newer version now exists, called Dynamic HTML, or DHTML.” —Language Finger, Maureen and Mike Mansfield Library, University of Montana.

Hello World example

<html>
<head>
<title>Hello World</title>
</head>
<body>
<p>Hello World</p>
</body>
</html>


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Last Updated: October 15, 2007

Created: October 10, 2007

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